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Archive for the ‘News & Features’ Category

SAN FRANCISCO—Following an extensive review of the Axiom Hotel’s green initiatives, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) has awarded the recently opened hotel the Silver level for its Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. LEED is the USGBC’s leading rating system for designing and constructing the world’s greenest, most energy efficient, and high performing buildings. It is a feature-oriented rating system that awards buildings points for satisfying specified green building criteria. The six major environmental categories of review include: Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Energy and Atmosphere, Materials and Resources, Indoor Environmental Quality and Innovation, and Design. Certification levels of LEED green buildings are awarded based on the total number of points earned within each LEED category. “We are thrilled with the design team’s ability to create such an environmentally responsible hotel for our guests and staff,” noted Garry Cox, the hotel’s General Manager. “The entire hotel team is extremely passionate about doing all they can to leave this world a better place for the next generation and earning the LEED Silver status is a giant step in the right direction.”
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NATIONAL REPORT—Paper or cloth? That is the “napkin” question that is answered in restaurant and other foodservice situations millions of times each day around the world. How that question is answered can have a sizeable impact on the environment and the volume of waste exiting a hotel. Not surprisingly, experts come down on both sides of the issue but most give cloth napkins the edge from a “green” standpoint. Also, as has been discovered time and time again by hoteliers, the kind of napkin presented can significantly impact the guest experience. Several years ago, Milliken & Company, a producer of table linens, hired a research company to gauge consumer preferences between paper and cloth napkins at sit-down restaurants. The study found that a majority of U.S. consumers prefer to dine at sit-down restaurants with a cloth napkin. Eight-two percent associated cloth napkins with a better restaurant appearance and ambiance, 75 percent associated them with better food quality, 88 percent with better service, and 84 percent with being environmentally friendly.
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NATIONAL REPORT—Paper or cloth? That is the “napkin” question that is answered in restaurant and other foodservice situations millions of times each day around the world. How that question is answered can have a sizeable impact on the environment and the volume of waste exiting a hotel. Not surprisingly, experts come down on both sides of the issue but most give cloth napkins the edge from a “green” standpoint. Also, as has been discovered time and time again by hoteliers, the kind of napkin presented can significantly impact the guest experience. Several years ago, Milliken & Company, a producer of table linens, hired a research company to gauge consumer preferences between paper and cloth napkins at sit-down restaurants. The study found that a majority of U.S. consumers prefer to dine at sit-down restaurants with a cloth napkin. Eight-two percent associated cloth napkins with a better restaurant appearance and ambiance, 75 percent associated them with better food quality, 88 percent with better service, and 84 percent with being environmentally friendly.
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BRUSSELS—Radisson Blu announced its new partnership with the Soap for Hope program, which recycles used hotel soaps to create fresh bars for distribution in local communities with limited access to hygiene and sanitation. The Soap for Hope program works in partnership with Sealed Air, a leader in food safety and security, facility hygiene and product protection. Soap for Hope was pioneered by Sealed Air to save lives by giving free soap to communities with limited access to soap, to create local entrepreneurs and to help hotels reduce waste through recycling. Capitalizing on the success of projects in Georgia and in the Philippines, 23 Radisson Blu hotels across Africa, Indian Ocean, Middle East and APAC will collect used soap bars and pass them to Sealed Air representatives. Local entrepreneurs are then shown how to recycle the soap using an innovative cold-press method, which takes less than 10 minutes to complete and requires no running water or electricity. The used soap is then distributed to local communities.
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BRUSSELS—Radisson Blu announced its new partnership with the Soap for Hope program, which recycles used hotel soaps to create fresh bars for distribution in local communities with limited access to hygiene and sanitation. The Soap for Hope program works in partnership with Sealed Air, a leader in food safety and security, facility hygiene and product protection. Soap for Hope was pioneered by Sealed Air to save lives by giving free soap to communities with limited access to soap, to create local entrepreneurs and to help hotels reduce waste through recycling. Capitalizing on the success of projects in Georgia and in the Philippines, 23 Radisson Blu hotels across Africa, Indian Ocean, Middle East and APAC will collect used soap bars and pass them to Sealed Air representatives. Local entrepreneurs are then shown how to recycle the soap using an innovative cold-press method, which takes less than 10 minutes to complete and requires no running water or electricity. The used soap is then distributed to local communities.
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BRUSSELS—Radisson Blu announced its new partnership with the Soap for Hope program, which recycles used hotel soaps to create fresh bars for distribution in local communities with limited access to hygiene and sanitation. The Soap for Hope program works in partnership with Sealed Air, a leader in food safety and security, facility hygiene and product protection. Soap for Hope was pioneered by Sealed Air to save lives by giving free soap to communities with limited access to soap, to create local entrepreneurs and to help hotels reduce waste through recycling. Capitalizing on the success of projects in Georgia and in the Philippines, 23 Radisson Blu hotels across Africa, Indian Ocean, Middle East and APAC will collect used soap bars and pass them to Sealed Air representatives. Local entrepreneurs are then shown how to recycle the soap using an innovative cold-press method, which takes less than 10 minutes to complete and requires no running water or electricity. The used soap is then distributed to local communities.
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ANSAN CITY, KOREA—The International Ecotourism Society announced that its 12th Ecotourism and Sustainable Tourism Conference (ESTC) will be held in Ansan City, Korea, from September 12 to 15, 2017. Widely considered to be the most important conference in ecotourism, ESTC 2017 will bring together 600 professionals and organizations from over 50 countries to share knowledge and best practices, as well as create ecotourism policy for the world.
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BETHESDA, MD.—From the panhandle of sunny Florida on the east coast of the United States, to Berlin, Germany, five properties of The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company house honeybees as extensions of their Community Footprints programs and continued commitment to environmental sustainability efforts. The first hotel of The Ritz-Carlton portfolio to act on the growing environmental concern over the honeybee shortage was The Ritz-Carlton, Charlotte in North Carolina. The LEED certified luxury hotel welcomed beehives on their rooftop in early 2010. The Ritz-Carlton, Charlotte now produces 60 to 100 pounds of honey each season, and in turn has used the honey throughout the restaurants in the hotel, as well as in the spa. Tours are available every Saturday for guests looking to deepen their understanding about the hives and support the ecosystem surrounding the hotel. The Ritz-Carlton, Sarasota responded to the national honeybee shortage by welcoming honeybees to the golf resort and went as far as to send their Director of Golf Grounds, Sean O’Brien, to become a certified beekeeper.
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AMSTERDAM—GRI launched the world’s first global standards for sustainability reporting, giving companies a common language for disclosing non-financial information. The GRI Sustainability Reporting Standards will enable companies around the world to be more transparent about their impacts on the economy, the environment and society. They will also help organizations make better decisions and contribute to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The GRI Standards are the latest evolution of GRI’s reporting disclosures, which have been developed through more than 15 years of a robust multi-stakeholder process. The Standards are based on the GRI G4 Guidelines, the world’s most widely used sustainability reporting disclosures, and feature an improved format and new modular structure. The new GRI Standards definitively replace the G4 Guidelines, which will be phased out by July 1, 2018. “The GRI Standards make it much easier for companies to report non-financial information, using a well-understood shared language,” said GRI Interim Chief Executive Eric Hespenheide. “The Standards are more straightforward, making them accessible to potentially millions of businesses worldwide.”
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AMSTERDAM—GRI launched the world’s first global standards for sustainability reporting, giving companies a common language for disclosing non-financial information. The GRI Sustainability Reporting Standards will enable companies around the world to be more transparent about their impacts on the economy, the environment and society. They will also help organizations make better decisions and contribute to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The GRI Standards are the latest evolution of GRI’s reporting disclosures, which have been developed through more than 15 years of a robust multi-stakeholder process. The Standards are based on the GRI G4 Guidelines, the world’s most widely used sustainability reporting disclosures, and feature an improved format and new modular structure. The new GRI Standards definitively replace the G4 Guidelines, which will be phased out by July 1, 2018. “The GRI Standards make it much easier for companies to report non-financial information, using a well-understood shared language,” said GRI Interim Chief Executive Eric Hespenheide. “The Standards are more straightforward, making them accessible to potentially millions of businesses worldwide.”
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